compton

Opinion
By James Pavel

  • Ice Cube’s son looks exactly like him. Duh.
  • Paul Giamatti excels at playing a slime ball. I mean that in the best possible way.
  • I didn’t anticipate Eazy-E to be the focal point of the movie, especially with Dre and Cube exercising so much creative control over the film.
  • After watching Dre’s version of how business went down with Ruthless Records and Death Row, it’d be wise to argue that the album ‘2001’ was the true pinnacle of his career. Dre had complete creative freedom, had no one to report to with the exception of Jimmy Iovine, had all of his apprentices on the album, and it features Dre’s most creative lyrics ever. The album ‘2001,’ which dropped in 1999 also set the precedent for all rap music that followed over the next six to eight years. There would be no “In da Club” or “Without Me” without the influence of Dre’s classic album. It also features arguably Eminem’s greatest lyrics ever. You know, the ones where he threatens those “loud-ass motherfuckin’ barkin’ dogs.”
  • Suge Knight is a horrible human being.
  • ‘Ain’t nuthin’ but a G thang’ is an amazing song, until you fast forward to the future and hear ‘Still D.R.E.’
  • I wish they had explained Eazy’s influence on Bone Thugs n’ Harmony a bit more. The audience only sees a tape labeled “Bone”, but this group continues to rep Eazy til’ this day, meaning that his influence on them was likely akin to Dre’s influence on Eminem.
  • Ice Cube had easily the most versatile and unpredictable career of any star showcased. Cube went from a gangster group, to writing a wildly successful movie, to eventually releasing an album (The War album) that merged rock/rap and came off as a gothic, apocalyptic adventure that rap has never really seen before or after. He then formed a new group called Westside Connection that became the greatest ambassadors of California outside of Snoop Dogg and the dead-too-soon Tupac Shakur. Sure, Cube went on and made a bunch of terrible movies, but at the end of the day, he still got paid, which was kind of always the plan wasn’t it?
  • Love that they included the Rodney King drama. Police brutality obviously was a huge influence on the creation and direction of NWA.
  • I can’t imagine having to make a movie about my own life. Obviously Dre and Cube have accomplished a great deal, making it somewhat easier to know what should be included, but how do you dramatize certain points and know what exactly would be considered turning points? The film made me realize that life isn’t like a movie at all. There is no one to film the tears or the climatic moments that transform a boy into a man. It’s all a blotched, confusing memory that becomes more difficult to explain as the years pass.
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